Patient Volition and Action in Occupational Therapy

Patient Volition and Action in Occupational Therapy

The ‘Patient Volition and Action in Occupational Therapy’ holds Vona du Toit’s original papers and presentations on the theory of creative ability, as it developed in the 1960s and 1970s. This book contains Vona du Toit’s work in progress. The contemporary representation of that work, presented as a model of practice is in the Crouch and Alers text.

 

Contents:

  • Initiative in occupational therapy (Dissertation)
  • Creative ability (Conference paper)
  • The restoration of activity participation leading to work participation (Conference paper)
  • The background theory related to creative ability which leads to work capacity (Paper)
  • The implementation of a programme aimed at evaluating the current level of creative ability in an individual and of stimulating the growth of his creative ability which leads to work
  • Capacity (Paper with focus on cerebral palsy)
  • An investigation into the correlation between volition and its expression in action (WFOT paper).
  • A personal experience, by Pieta Compaan
  • The South African model of creative participation, by Dain van der Reyden (WFOT paper)

UK Cost: Just £19.50 including postage and packing to mainland UK.

Please contact sarahwilson@vdtmocaf-uk.com regarding rates for postage outside of the UK.

Clinician Reviews

Read these reviews from clinicians working with the VdT MoCA:

 

Natasha Hodgson March 2015                    (rated 4 out of 5 stars)

This book contains a lot of useful information and I found the included tables were key to me to gain a quick reference if I was unsure of a person’s level of creative ability and treatment aims.  This book works well alongside the de Witt chapter in the Crouch and Alers book (2014).

 

Margot Clayton March 2015                        (rated 5 out of 5 stars)

Delighted to say that I found the book most helpful when doing an MSc OT (post registration).  It was most valuable to have as a reference at that time.

 

Helen Carroll, Northampton                       (rated 5 out of 5 stars)

Working in a team that uses the VdT MoCA exclusively it has been important to have the best reference material available to support my everyday practice. This South African publication brings together the original papers by Vona du Toit as a brief chronological account of her work along with various studies and papers that give an account of her thinking and concepts behind the model. It details the clinical picture, motivation and action relating to each level and provides appropriate treatment aims and level specific approaches for treatment.  This short publication has been an invaluable guide to the recent developments within our mental health inpatient service and the provision of effective therapy. Due to regular use of this book as a ‘dip in and out’ resource our assessment process has become more frequent and consistent in approach and treatments have been tailored to support very specific aims. As an everyday tool “Patient Volition and Action in Occupational Therapy” could be used in any setting and I would strongly recommend that it should be part of every occupational therapist’s reference collection.

 

Matthew Carter, Kettering                         (rated 4 out of 5 stars)

This book is a very useful collection of academic papers, essays and conference presentations. It is invaluable as a key text for the VdT MoCA and provides an in-depth look into the theory that underpins the model. I have used it throughout my post-graduate studies and would recommend it too anyone who already has a basic knowledge of the model and wants to explore key concepts in more depth.

 

Gosia Rospond, Birmingham                       (rated 5 out of 5 stars)

I was first introduced to this publication during a course exploring use of the model and its benefits in occupational therapy practice. I was already using the model for several years and had basic training in its principles and application.

Both clinical practice and evidence based enquires caused me to formulate questions which I found difficult to address.  This publication helped me to understand Vona better, and have more grasp on her perspective on occupational therapy. This put the model and everything I new about it by that time in a new context. This was a changing point in my clinical reasoning.

The first part of the book explains the principles of the model. I must admit that references to psychological and philosophical theories may be overwhelming as they require academic knowledge, but the context of human being – ‘The Man’, is crucial to understanding the concept. It is absolutely fundamental to relate to that perspective, with understanding that creative ability may be explored not only with ‘ill’ people, but generally speaking with everyone.

The second part of the book presents a systematic description of levels of creative ability, and how to stimulate personal growth including treatment goals and treatment methods. The last part consists of number of papers presented by Vona and her followers during prestigious international conferences.

This publication is a concise reference in everyday practice, and I tend to keep a copy on my desk in the workplace. This will usually be my first evidence base in case of addressing arising enquiries. The chapters allow the reader to dip into any section in which they have keen interest or about which they just wish to discover more.

The greatest selling point of this book is perhaps the clear connection with practice. When we are looking for literature to support our practice, the usual problem is that theoretical background and practical application is separated. It appears that this publication meets both demands.

The publication is universal and relevant to all settings where occupational therapy skills might be applicable. Not only physical and mental health care, but also role emerging placements, leadership and management.

I would recommend it to anyone working within occupational therapy, experienced practitioners and managers will benefit equally as well as students and newly qualified occupational therapists.

Research and Networking

Research and Networking

Connections for participation.

Centres of Excellence

Centres of Excellence

Developing UK services as exemplars of the model in practice. Visit the first centre.

Training, CPD and Resources

Training, CPD and Resources

Find out how you can develop your creative ability.

In Global Contexts

In Global Contexts

The cross-national relevance of the VdT MoCA.

Assessment and Treatment

Assessment and Treatment

Assessment, Assessment recording tools and outcome measures

What is the VdT MoCA

What is the VdT MoCA

The Vona du Toit Model of Creative Ability (Vdt MoCA) is an occupational therapy practice model originating from South Africa.